Taylor

humansofnewyork:


"I try not to fight with people anymore. I just say: ‘You want to be stupid? You stay stupid. I’m moving forward.’"

humansofnewyork:

"I try not to fight with people anymore. I just say: ‘You want to be stupid? You stay stupid. I’m moving forward.’"

erikkwakkel:

A snippet Jane Austen: how medieval!
A rare paper snippet in Jane Austen’s handwriting was discovered. Written in 1814, it contains highlights from a sermon held by her brother. Reading the news I was struck by the parallel with similar finds from the Middle Ages. For one thing, in both cases such discoveries raise more questions than they answer. Was there originally more than this? Why did Austen (and her medieval peers) create the tiny note? Why did it lay dormant for so long? The most intriguing question (and parallel) is related to what is actually hidden from view. While the front of the Austen-fragment can be read, the back cannot, because the snippet is pasted onto a larger sheet. Experts are trying to separate the two, hoping to double their understanding. This is as medieval as can be. Strips from medieval books, after all, are frequently found pasted - recycled - on bookbindings. These fragments also provide a tantalizing, albeit one-sided view at a discovered written object from the past.
Read more in this Guardian article, which is also the source of the image. More about medieval snippets pasted onto bookbindings in this post I wrote a while back.

erikkwakkel:

A snippet Jane Austen: how medieval!

A rare paper snippet in Jane Austen’s handwriting was discovered. Written in 1814, it contains highlights from a sermon held by her brother. Reading the news I was struck by the parallel with similar finds from the Middle Ages. For one thing, in both cases such discoveries raise more questions than they answer. Was there originally more than this? Why did Austen (and her medieval peers) create the tiny note? Why did it lay dormant for so long? The most intriguing question (and parallel) is related to what is actually hidden from view. While the front of the Austen-fragment can be read, the back cannot, because the snippet is pasted onto a larger sheet. Experts are trying to separate the two, hoping to double their understanding. This is as medieval as can be. Strips from medieval books, after all, are frequently found pasted - recycled - on bookbindings. These fragments also provide a tantalizing, albeit one-sided view at a discovered written object from the past.

Read more in this Guardian article, which is also the source of the image. More about medieval snippets pasted onto bookbindings in this post I wrote a while back.

(via themindofaconservator)

theneedledrop:

St. Vincent - “Digital Witness”

….I’m about to lose my shit over this!

reuterspictures:

Storm in the South
Icicles are seen forming on a fountain during winter at Jackson Square Park in New Orleans, Louisiana, January 29, 2014. A rare blast of snow, sleet and ice hit the South on Tuesday, prompting five states to declare a state of emergency, closing the New Orleans airport and causing chaos on roads for drivers unaccustomed to the dangerously slick conditions. REUTERS/Jonathan Bachman

reuterspictures:

Storm in the South

Icicles are seen forming on a fountain during winter at Jackson Square Park in New Orleans, Louisiana, January 29, 2014. A rare blast of snow, sleet and ice hit the South on Tuesday, prompting five states to declare a state of emergency, closing the New Orleans airport and causing chaos on roads for drivers unaccustomed to the dangerously slick conditions. REUTERS/Jonathan Bachman

(via npr)

A few shots from the Moscow’s Pushkin Museum of Fine Arts (click images for a better quality and higher resolution)

(Source: iago-rotten, via themindofaconservator)